Searsport to consider moratorium petition from propane tank opponents

Posted Dec. 04, 2011, at 5:53 p.m.
Last modified Dec. 04, 2011, at 6:18 p.m.
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Judy Kaiser, 70, of Waldo, stood in the cold Saturday, Nov. 19, in Searsport to protest a plan to build a large propane storage tank in town.
Judy Kaiser, 70, of Waldo, stood in the cold Saturday, Nov. 19, in Searsport to protest a plan to build a large propane storage tank in town. Buy Photo

SEARSPORT, Maine — As soon as a Denver-based company last year proposed building a massive new propane import terminal in Searsport, the project has proved to be volatile in the midcoast.

DCP Midstream’s first informational meetings last December about its desire to build a $40 million terminal in the Mack Point industrial zone prompted vigorous arguments both for and against the project. And when the Maine Department of Environmental Protection in late October signed a permit for DCP Midstream’s application to construct a terminal there, including a 138-foot-tall propane tank, opposition to the project appeared to fiercely ignite.

The 30 or so tanks already at the existing tank farm at the point are much shorter, measuring about 50 feet tall.

Those in favor of its construction say that Maine needs a local supply source for propane and that the industry is tightly regulated and safe. They argue that it will increase the local tax base and bring some jobs to the area.

“Today, much of the propane coming into Maine is trucked in from out of state,” wrote Doug Morrell of Downeast Energy in Brunswick in a recent BDN letter to the editor. “By supporting DCP Midstream’s proposed marine import terminal, we are reducing the overall truck traffic in the state and lessening the cost of overall transportation for Maine consumers.”

But those against cite concerns about safety, the visual impact to the coastal area and increased truck traffic along Route 1 and Route 3 as the imported propane is carried towards customers.

More than 100 protesters carried signs on Saturday, Nov. 19, expressing their desire to stop the tank project.

“If something comes in of this size, it’s going to change our entire landscape here,” Astrig Tanguay said Saturday. “We want to frame the conversation, ‘How will this benefit our town and our region?’”

Request for moratorium

The Searsport businesswoman is part of Thanks but no Tank, a new, grass-roots group that is working to keep the massive propane tank out of town. Members have circulated a petition on the website www.moveon.org that has received about 2,300 signatures so far. They have also locally circulated a petition for a six-month moratorium on major projects, in order to have time to look at the town’s comprehensive plan and make sure it “covers all the things we’re most concerned with,” Tanguay said.

She said that although 135 signatures were needed to bring the petition to the Searsport Board of Selectmen, they easily were able to obtain 230 signatures.

It will come before the selectmen on Tuesday night, according to Tanguay. Searsport residents would have to vote on a moratorium at the annual town meeting in March, she said.

Last month, Roz Elliott, a spokesperson for DCP MIdstream, attempted to defuse some of the opponents’ biggest concerns, such as the danger of having that much combustible fuel stored close to Route 1.

She said that safety is the company’s top value, and that employees are trained to meet the highest safety standards.

“This potential propane import terminal in Searsport, it’s not just an operation to us. It’s the home of our future employees,” she said.

Nuts and bolts

If DCP Midstream’s proposed marine terminal is built at Mack Point, as many as six propane tankers a year would be allowed to offload the fuel at the area’s existing cargo pier. The liquid propane would be pumped through a new, mile-long pipeline that would run primarily above ground to the bulk storage tank at the DCP terminal. The company would offload the propane to trucks and rail cars at the terminal for distribution throughout Maine and potentially to other locations in northern New England. Truck traffic would increase by as much as 50 trips a day, according to a full-page ad the company took out in the BDN last month.

According to recent U.S. Census data information, about 34,000, or six percent, of Maine homes heat with propane. In neighboring New Hampshire, about 12 percent of homes heat that way and about 15 percent of homes in Vermont do.

Searsport Town Manager James Gillway said Friday that the town has not yet received a permit application from DCP Midstream for the project. It would have to receive final approval from the Searsport Planning Board.

“We’re all kind of in limbo,” he said. “We’re getting a lot of letters against and a few letters for, from Searsport and beyond.”

Gillway said that he was under the impression that DCP Midstream was waiting for another permit by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers before submitting an application to the town.

Last month, Elliott said that her company was continuing to work its way through the application process and that it was too soon to give any kind of construction timeline.

DEP review

Some who don’t want the tank have been asking how DCP Midstream was able to secure permits from the Maine Department of Environmental Protection so seemingly fast.

“I can’t believe that DEP granted permits in some of the areas that they did. It defies common sense,” said Marietta Ramsdell of Searsport. “Sometimes, permitting takes years. Basically, this took several months.”

Maine Department of Environmental Protection spokesperson Samantha DePoy-Warren said that this complaint was ironic.

“We get accused of having a slow permitting process, and then we get accused of passing projects too fast,” she said. “This was a very thorough and thoughtful review. With any of these projects, there’s a public comment period that’s required. Nothing can be rushed through.”

But Robin Clukey, an environmental specialist at the Maine Department of Protection, said that she received the application from DCP Midstream on May 20 and accepted it as complete on June 13.

That’s when the clock started to tick for opponents, she said. Interested parties have 20 days from the date that an application has been accepted as complete to file a request for a public hearing from the commissioner or for jurisdiction from the Board of Environmental Protection.

“Nobody did that,” Clukey said.

She continued to work on the application, checking to see if it demonstrated compliance with the standards of the Natural Resources Protection Act and the Site Location of Development Act. Clukey, an engineer, a geologist and an official from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife all reviewed it. Finally, Clukey recommended that a draft order be signed, which was issued on Sept. 13.

At that point, 30 people submitted comments to the Maine Department of Environmental Protection about the application, she said.

DePoy-Warren said that the department has received a number of letters from concerned citizens. Right now, the Maine Attorney General’s Office is reviewing letters received between Oct. 24, when the permit was issued, and Nov. 23, when the comment period ended.

“It’s not clear at this point if those letters constitute a formalized appeal,” she said. “If it is determined it’s an appeal, it’s likely that the board would consider that in early 2012.”

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  • Yes, Selfish to not want to have a safe town and ask the right questions. Let's just sell out the town for 8-14 jobs?!

    It is not a secure location. It will put even more traffic on Rt.1 and will negatively affect local business.

    This is not just about scenery.

    And no one has proved that there will be any property tax relief because of this project.
    So where are the benefits?

  • hailey monteith 12/04/2011 06:49 PM
    The Thanks But No Tank group does NOT speak for all Searsport. They have proliferated known lies, misrepresentations, and fear mongering. This will diversify our economy and give us a chance at renewed properity. What do you have against more property taxes and more good paying jobs?They may be loud, but they are not right, and they are selfish.

  • I went to the fact finding presentation at the Searsport
    Town Hall put on by TBNT and in no way thought they were trying to deceive or
    pretend to represent the town.  All of
    the slides were pictures taken of the DCP permit, State and Federal Government
    webpages, newspaper headlines and quotes from the State’s Brookings institute
    report payed for by the State’s Planning Office .  They did invite members of the planning
    board, selectman and the port community to sit in on the presentations to make
    sure they were not being misleading or that they had their facts correct.  The goal is fact collecting which has been
    seriously lacking to this point in the permitting process.  If tax payers are going to be investing in
    road and bridge upgrades and repairs to build up an industrial geared
    infrastructure they have a right to ask questions.



  • BIG TANK


    To
    be sung to the tune of Big John


    Every morning at dawn he looms over the trees


    He stands 138 and holds almost 23.


    Kinda broad at the shoulder and also at the ground


    And everybody knows you don’t mess around


    With BIG TANK.


     


    Now DCP Midstream says they’re our friend,


    They helped in ’07 and they want to again.


    They’ll keep us toasty if we give the okay


    And all we have to do is look the other way


    From BIG TANK.


     


    Now as for the trucks, they say just a few more.


    Never mind that our permit says 144.


    That’s 288 if you do the math,


    Every day, don’t forget, and what’s the path?


    Why, right down Main Street—who cares about the din?


    Everybody sleeps easy, now that we’re in


    With BIG TANK.


     


    How about that flare—let’s burn some gas!


    It’s just 500 hours, it’ll quickly pass.


    Maybe we can use it to make s’mores!


    We’ll need a tall ladder and some really long forks.


    DCP’ll bring the fire, they’re such friendly fellows,


    Just need some chocolate—we’re the marshmallows.


    We’ll have us a picnic along the shore


    And we’ll be glad we opened the door


    To BIG TANK.


     


    And what about that scenic view?


    Can’t see it from the woods—well, I guess that’s true.


    DEP says relax, cool it please,


    You can’t see the tank if you’re in the trees.


    And if you’re out on the Bay, you can find your way home


    So easy, now that you can spot the dome


    Of BIG TANK.


     


    Let’s send a note to those summer folk


    Don’t stay home—it’s just a little smoke!


    And a cute little flare, and a couple of trucks


    Full of flammable stuff, but with some luck


    They won’t even crash, just clog up the roads


    And wake you up with their propane loads.


    But you’ll have fun here, cause DCP’s


    A good neighbor to all—and, you’ll get to see


    The BIG TANK.


     
     

  • What about the fault line that runs under that area?
    The same Fault that prevented the Nuclear power plant/aluminum smelter on Sears island.
  • While I think it would be of significant economic benefit, ultimatly it is up to the residents of Searsport to decide, and no one else.

    Someone should get Quimby, Dill, & Pingree involved, they really know how to kill industry.

  • Over 200 Searsport voters  leaning both for and against the LNG tank,  signed a petition recently seeking a moratorium on town approval of construction of such projects.  We all need  learn more about the real potential benefits and real harm of the project    An economic impact study would allow citizens and our Town Fathers to make a more informed decision about this project which, if built,  will change the nature of Searsport and the surrounding communities for ever.
    Let us  support efforts to obtain such a study.

  • chuckepilgrim 12/04/2011 07:04 PM
    Would be nice to have the port up and running ...LNG  would also be very good for our state!!

    The liberals don't want to support jobs .. They will support their occupy people
  • Are the jobs the project might create truly appealing to Searsport youth? Are gas station jobs or dock jobs ones that will keep them here? Is this their idea for THEIR futures?

    Have you done YOUR homework to investigate the potential hazards of this tank to be located just behind Main Street? The company spokesperson says, “Safety is a core value.” It dos little searching to see the devastation that can result when a natural disaster, or human error causes something to go drastically wrong.

    Do the bay and the fishing & wildlife industries that rely on it matter to YOU? Do you know the disruptions that will occur when the tankers come & go, idling in the bay while waiting for high tide; dumping their bilge water from say, Africa, with its bacteria and microbes and invasive species to wreak havoc with the native fish and flora?

    Do YOU know that there will be roughly a 1000-yard buffer zone required around the tankers where NO other boats are allowed? During the delay time while the tankers wait for maximum high tide to allow clearance to move to the dock, up to a days wait, NO other boats from fishing to pleasure to kayaks are allowed in.

    And because this zone is NOT a “protected zone”, but merely a buffer zone, it could be a potential target for terrorist activity. You can laugh at this, but there were 2 militia men arrested in CA recently for just this.

    Once the tank is here, it will be here forever. The fact that smaller tanks exist is not a strong enough reason to install a 23 MILLION GALLON one. There is a HUGE difference.

    The LPG is primarily for OTHER parts of New England and Canada, NOT for us. Mainers only use approximately 3% propane for heating, with oil at #1 and wood at #2. A 23 million gallon tank, refilled 6 times a year, is NOT bringing LPG here for us – it’s for others who are more ”away” than all of us. And you can’t get much more
    AWAY than Conoco-Phillips and their MULTINATIONAL corporation importing from QATAR.

    If YOU think THEY, Conoco-Phillips or their LLC front, Midstream DCP, care about US, you are deluding yourself. Have YOU done YOUR homework?
  • And where are you from or perhaps your old money people y and have no clue what life in the working world is like.. The papermill were bad so now we are getting rid of them along with hthe shoe shops that allowed familiies to earn a living probably not to your standards or the occupy standard but we all ate and found that if we worked hard and were industrious we enjoyed our lives... I heat and cook with propane to save oil what do you do but run your mouth and creat carbon dioxide!!

    ________________________________
    From: Disqus <>
    To: chuckepilgrim@yahoo.com
    Sent: Monday, December 5, 2011 10:10 AM
    Subject: [bdn] Re: Propane terminal proving volatile topic in midcoast Maine

    Disqus generic email template

    artichokehearts wrote, in response to chuckepilgrim:




    Are the jobs the project might create truly appealing to
    Searsport youth?  Are gas station
    jobs or dock jobs ones that will keep them here?  Is this their idea for THEIR futures?


     


    Have you done YOUR homework to investigate the potential hazards
    of this tank to be located just behind Main Street?  The company spokesperson says, “Safety is a core
    value.”  It dos little searching to
    see the devastation that can result when a natural disaster, or human error
    causes something to go drastically wrong.  


     


    Do the bay and the fishing & wildlife industries that
    rely on it matter to YOU?  Do you
    know the disruptions that will occur when the tankers come & go, idling in
    the bay while waiting for high tide; dumping their bilge water from say,
    Africa, with its bacteria and microbes and invasive species to wreak havoc with
    the native fish and flora?

     


    Do YOU know
    that there will be roughly a 1000-yard buffer zone required around the tankers
    where NO other boats are allowed? During the delay time while the tankers wait
    for maximum high tide to allow clearance to move to the dock, up to a days
    wait, NO other boats from fishing to pleasure to kayaks are allowed in.


     


    And because
    this zone is NOT a “protected zone”, but merely a buffer zone, it could be a
    potential target for terrorist activity. You can laugh at this, but there were
    2 militia men arrested in CA recently for just this.


     


    Once the tank
    is here, it will be here forever. 
    The fact that smaller tanks exist is not a strong enough reason to
    install a 23 MILLION GALLON one. 
    There is a HUGE difference. 



     


    The LPG is primarily
    for OTHER parts of New England and Canada, NOT for us.  Mainers only use approximately 3%
    propane for heating, with oil at #1 and wood at #2.  A 23 million gallon tank, refilled 6 times a year, is NOT
    bringing LPG here for us – it’s for others who are more ”away” than all of us.  And you can’t get much more

    AWAY than Conoco-Phillips
    and their MULTINATIONAL corporation importing from QATAR.

     


     If YOU think THEY, Conoco-Phillips or
    their LLC front, Midstream DCP, care about US, you are deluding yourself. Have
    YOU done YOUR homework?


    Link to comment


  • When our mill rate was the highest in the State and we were
    the first to lose school accreditation our downtown was barren, businesses were
    struggling and tax payers were being asked to spend more on the proposed port
    on Sears Island.  Small businesses
    started to help rebuild our town without grant money or tax breaks by bringing in
    more jobs, supporting SOS and a new safety building, taking on a larger tax
    burden and attracting large sums of money to our communities.

    The business owners
    did this by taking out loans, investing their life savings, working long hours
    and multiple jobs all to get an idea off the ground in a home they love.  It’s really is a despicable
    effort to discredit small business and home owners who have put so much money
    into our town to make it a better place. 
    Without them our main street would still be full of empty storefronts
    and our wonderful Sea Captains homes of the past would have fallen in.

    Not only have the tax payers spent millions on the ports infrastructure through
    bonds and grants but NO one has ever held a protest against any current
    business or expansion projects in the industrial zone of Searsport.   Even as the port has become louder, brighter the town's people supported the industrial zone and its balance with the communities growth.



    You can’t just complain about people that work harder than
    you and expect your life’s conditions to improve.  You need to get out there and make it
    happen.  That’s the main difference.  Our area still has unlimited growth potential
    for small, local business owners to be successful.  How many of you were there to work when the
    State built the causeway?  I’ll never
    forget the friends of mine that were hired from Down east because there were
    only a few workers locally that wanted the jobs.  

    My apologies for the rant but we can't recover without small business.


  • Put it right next to your house so when a terrorist hits it, we will not have to hear your ignorant comments...


  • Not committing to the LNG scam was smart.  They did not
    have their financing in place, it was a speculative venture that never came to
    fruition.  People seem to be fueling their anger by blaming the
    environmentalists or the ” trust fund” babies that came to start business in a
    dying town.  But you’re fooling yourselves to think various proposed
    expanded port projects were stopped by environmental groups , it's always been about
    economics, from the tens of millions in taxpayer money spent speculating on a
    port to the linear rail being discussed for a cargo part.  The Army Corp
    of Engineers shut that project down, no one else, in large part because the
    Island port plan would have cost close to $50 of investment for every $1
    made.   Now we’re talking again about
    importing foreign fossil fuel while considering the export of wood
    pellets. 


    The Governor is supporting investments in pipelines for
    natural gas which is not LPG.  LPG is a
    primary heat source for about 5% of all Mainers according to the latest census,
    is the most expensive of all fossil fuels and we do not have a shortage.  There was a ten day distribution problem due
    to a Canadian railroad strike several years ago


  • What's one more tank ?   How many are already located at Sprague Irving GAC etc
  • Some people care more about their scenery, than if their neighbor gets a job.
  • A lot of the opposition is from people who moved to Searsport after making their fortunes out of state or living off a trust fund or inheritance.  "You don't know how lucky you are to live here!" is a common argument - though they travel to Florida for the winter to escape the cold.  Searsport has one of the highest mil rates ($19.80) on the coast ... even Bar Harbor is only $9.60!   There is no hope in sight for the next generation to be able to afford to grow up and live in this town.

    The knowbetters have always preached doom and despair to drive out every bit of large scale industry interest in this town. 

    Sure makes that container port proposal for Sears Island a few years back look good now, huh?   But at least we saved the eel grass.....
  • Are the jobs the project might create truly appealing to Searsport youth? Are gas station jobs or dock jobs ones that will keep them here? Is this their idea for THEIR futures?

    Have you done YOUR homework to investigate the potential hazards of this tank to be located just behind Main Street? The company spokesperson says, “Safety is a core value.” It dos little searching to see the devastation that can result when a natural disaster, or human error causes something to go drastically wrong.

    Do the bay and the fishing & wildlife industries that rely on it matter to YOU? Do you know the disruptions that will occur when the tankers come & go, idling in the bay while waiting for high tide; dumping their bilge water from say, Africa, with its bacteria and microbes and invasive species to wreak havoc with the native fish and flora?

    Do YOU know that there will be roughly a 1000-yard buffer zone required around the tankers where NO other boats are allowed? During the delay time while the tankers wait for maximum high tide to allow clearance to move to the dock, up to a days wait, NO other boats from fishing to pleasure to kayaks are allowed in.

    And because this zone is NOT a “protected zone”, but merely a buffer zone, it could be a potential target for terrorist activity. You can laugh at this, but there were 2 militia men arrested in CA recently for just this.

    Once the tank is here, it will be here forever. The fact that smaller tanks exist is not a strong enough reason to install a 23 MILLION GALLON one. There is a HUGE difference.

    The LPG is primarily for OTHER parts of New England and Canada, NOT for us. Mainers only use approximately 3% propane for heating, with oil at #1 and wood at #2. A 23 million gallon tank, refilled 6 times a year, is NOT bringing LPG here for us – it’s for others who are more ”away” than all of us. And you can’t get much more
    AWAY than Conoco-Phillips and their MULTINATIONAL corporation importing from QATAR.

    If YOU think THEY, Conoco-Phillips or their LLC front, Midstream DCP, care about US, you are deluding yourself. Have YOU done YOUR homework?
  • Wow - What a VERY nicely-crafted answer with a derogatory and accusatory tone that somebody has their computer set for immediate auto-response - I received this in my e-mail inbox less than 10 minutes after I posted my comment. MOST impressive. This doesn't change my mind in the least - and in fact, it only reinforces my position. Whoever wrote this is obviously not a native of my town or the area - but is more than willing to tell me how I should think. And yes, I have seen the ships anchored in the harbor awaiting their turn to tie up at the docks to onload/offload cargo and petroleum products. As they have for YEARS because we are a natural deep-water port, ideally suited to this industry. You don't scare me in the least. Go sell your threatening tones elsewhere - we're all stocked up here in this town.
  • Dear Searsport,
    My letter is not meant to scare anyone.
    Governor LePage stated recently the necessity to promote other forms of energy to meet our needs. What happened to the wood pellet company that wanted to establish a business here; but, as reported in the Republican Journal, recently left for North Carolina? Why? Why not that type of business since the natural resources and work force are here in plentitude?
    Like many residents who have an opinion on the tank, although we do not all reside in Searsport proper, it is important to be involved in serious events that impact the community at-large. Like you, I care enough to take a stand.
    What happens to the bay with 23 million gallons of liquefied petroleum gas, impacts all of us along the Mid-coast.
  • Equating a skilled job working at a tank terminal with a "gas station job" is ridiculous, sort of like saying that a guy repairing a 10 million dollar turbine is a "grease monkey." The person quoted in this article is part of a family that owns a campground/RV park on the shore of Searsport. She was very vociferous, but not terribly knowledgeable, on the subject of liquified natural gas (LNG) when that was proposed. 
    LNG would have been a pretty straightforward deal, with few downside risks: LNG is lighter than air, and so disperses if it's spilled. It also would have left Searsport by pipeline, with no impact on highway traffic. 
    Liquified Propane Gas (LPG) is more problematic. it's heavier than air, and so a spill tends to concentrate, not disperse. It would leave the terminal by rail car or tank truck. The trucks would present some hazard of a truck crash and spill. Would this traffic go on route one? Not unless it was a local shipment. Any trucker bound for the other New England states would drive a few miles north and get on I-95 at Hampden. In the off season, if traffic is light, he might go 7 miles along route 1 to route 3 in Belfast.
    The "exclusion zone" around ships is a bogus talking point. Anyone who has operated a commercial vessel on East Penobscot Bay will tell you that it's pretty quiet out there. Plenty of room, even in August, for the yachtsmen and the sainted lobstermen to keep their distance. 
    I speak on this subject as someone who's operated boats in Midcoast waters since 1977, sailing on yachts, passenger boats, schooners, research vessel, fishing boats, tugboats, and tankers. On that base of experience, I say with some confidence that there would be no problems for any class of navigation.


  • Agreed that an exclusion zone
    may be a side point as many are more concerned about the completion our local
    Emergency management plans, the increase in truck traffic, the proximity to
    Route One businesses and Homes, etc.    In all of
    the other ports there is a Safety and Security Zone around the ship as it
    travels into a port. I must assume that is defined by when the Pilot boards. The
    Zone is 1 mile in advance, 1/2 mile to the stern and 1000 yards to the side.
    This pertains to the entire period that the ship is docked and offloading.
    Since the harbor has just enough water depth at high tide then that is another
    factor and would create certain delays. 


    While there is no federal
    regulation that mandates that LPG tankers have a waterside security escort it
    is, in fact, a safeguard that is ALWAYS available to the Captain of the Port
    (COTP) and is often used at his/her discretion to enforce federally established
    safety and security zones. In the case of the DCP proposal, the eventual
    employment of safety/security zones and their associated physical parameters is
    still being deliberated.  


    Additionally, please note that
    the Coast Guard Captain of the Port ALWAYS has authority under the Magnuson Act
    to prohibit LHG (which includes LPG) transfer operations or LHG vessel
    movements within his area of responsibility AT ANY TIME if he determines that
    such action is necessary to protect the waterway, port, or marine environment.
    Orders under these Acts take place pursuant to their own administrative
    processes, completely and separate from the aforementioned Waterway Suitability
    Assessment and/or Letter of Recommendation.


     


    Consider the total economic
    picture and help us to collect the facts, TBNT
     

  • If Searsport doesn't want it I hope the company will look at other coastal communities up this way!  Seems to me that theres a lot of potential benefits to the region as a whole not just one town.  Potentially lower propane prices and property taxes, and a few more jobs to the area.  Verso most likely won't be around forever and at some point we as a region need to begin looking at using the river for what it is....A HUGE resource!
  • Navigation up to the docks in Bucksport is a lot more complicated, time-consuming, and expensive than going to Searsport. It also presents a lot more security hazards.
  • Stephen I couldn't agree with you more.  I'd like to see Searsport get this but if they don't want it I'm just hoping we as a region don't lose this opportunity all together.

  • hasacluemaine 12/05/2011 09:25 AM
    Hmmm, reading the article one gets a sense of BDN bias. In light of recent stories about the six turbine wind farm for Mt. Waldo, from this same reporter, I come to the following conclusion about her bias: Big Wind Good...Big Gas Bad.
  • It's not biased, it's direct and clear.  Reread it.


  • Agreed that an exclusion zone
    may be a side point as many are more concerned about the completion our local
    Emergency management plans, the increase in truck traffic, the proximity to
    Route One businesses and Homes, etc.    In all of
    the other ports there is a Safety and Security Zone around the ship as it
    travels into a port. I must assume that is defined by when the Pilot boards. The
    Zone is 1 mile in advance, 1/2 mile to the stern and 1000 yards to the side.
    This pertains to the entire period that the ship is docked and offloading.
    Since the harbor has just enough water depth at high tide then that is another
    factor and would create certain delays. 


    While there is no federal
    regulation that mandates that LPG tankers have a waterside security escort it
    is, in fact, a safeguard that is ALWAYS available to the Captain of the Port
    (COTP) and is often used at his/her discretion to enforce federally established
    safety and security zones. In the case of the DCP proposal, the eventual
    employment of safety/security zones and their associated physical parameters is
    still being deliberated.  


    Additionally, please note that
    the Coast Guard Captain of the Port ALWAYS has authority under the Magnuson Act
    to prohibit LHG (which includes LPG) transfer operations or LHG vessel
    movements within his area of responsibility AT ANY TIME if he determines that
    such action is necessary to protect the waterway, port, or marine environment.
    Orders under these Acts take place pursuant to their own administrative
    processes, completely and separate from the aforementioned Waterway Suitability
    Assessment and/or Letter of Recommendation.


     


    Consider the total economic
    picture and help us to collect the facts, TBNT


     


  • myotherbrotherdarrell 12/06/2011 12:45 PM
    Let's start posting some facts:

    www.npga.org/files/public/Fact...
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